Xperia Z5

Sony Xperia Z5 design and build quality At first glance, the back of the Xperia Z5 looks like it's ...

Note 10.1 (2014)

March 1, 2014 posted by Jesse Oguntimehin Phone Review of SAMSUNG GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014) Edition...

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Xperia Z5

Sony Xperia Z5 design and build quality
At first glance, the back of the Xperia Z5 looks like it's made from metal, but it is actually frosted matte glass. This looks good but also makes it smooth and very slippery. The sides of the phone are slippier still. The edges of the phone – where the sides meet the front and the back – are slightly but significantly pronounced.
These raised edges do at least give you something to grip onto, but they also accumulate grit and grime. They also like to snag your hair, both above your ear and, if you have a beard, on the side of your chin, which can get annoying.

The Xperia Z5 looks great.
Despite these peculiar design choices, the Xperia Z5 is the best-looking Xperia device yet. It stays true to Sony's Omnibalance design but boasts some subtle improvements. The Xperia Z5 is very well put together, with Gorilla Glass 4 on the front and back, an aluminum frame and rubber bumpers on the corners to help absorb shock if the phone is dropped.
Sony released a pink version of the Xperia Z5 on January 12, 2016. The release came later in the phone's lifecycle, potentially as a drawcard for potential buyers who prefer a more eye-catching color to thefrosted glass and metal design.
The Xperia Z5 is also dustproof and waterproof (it has an IP rating of IP68, which means it is dust-tight and protected against continued immersion in more than 1 m of fresh water), although you should observe Sony's advice regarding water-resistance on Xperia devices.
There's only one waterproof flap on the Z5, the one covering the nano-SIM and microSD card port. / © ANDROIDPIT
The Xperia Z5 measures 146 x 72 x 7.5 mm, but fits comfortably in your hand. The buttons for volume, camera shutter and power are all located on the right-hand side of the phone. The power button, which was circular on the Z3, is now pill-shaped, and also houses a fingerprint scanner.
The left-hand side of the device now has a stamped Xperia logo at the bottom and a flap at the top, under which you'll find the nano-SIM card slot. This slot also provides access for microSD card expansion (up to 200 GB).
 
 

Galaxy S7

Samsung may have played coy with its smartphone launch plans yesterday, but today the company has given the game away entirely…    
Whether by accident or as a deliberate teaser (I suspect the latter), GalaxyClub spotted Samsung has published details confirming the upcoming 5.5-inch Galaxy S7 Edge – the line’s most premium handset. The site confirms the name ‘S7 Edge’ and upgraded functionality exclusive to the Edge range. 
Most notable with the latter element is the addition of ‘Wide Type’ edge panels which will also come to the S6 Edge and S6 Edge Plus with their impending upgrade to Android Marshmallow. As the name suggests, Wide Type panels allow for richer functionality including a compass, phone status and news widgets rather akin to the ‘Live Tiles’ Microsoft MSFT -1.89% uses on Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile.
As with ‘Narrow Type’ edge panels, Wide Type panels are accessed with a swipe from the edge of the phone. The exact position for the swipe and which panel(s) you prefer to see can be customised in settings, along with the ability to add multiple panels that can be cycled through with additional swipes. It remains something of a gimmick, but is improving month on month.
Looking at the big picture, we now know just about everything about what Samsung plans to release on February 21st. This including detailed specifications for both the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge and their slightly modified designs.
Samsung has 'accidentally' confirmed the Galaxy S7 Edge. Image credit: GalaxyClub.nl

Samsung has ‘accidentally’ confirmed the Galaxy S7 Edge. Image credit: GalaxyClub.nl

Most notable with the latter element is the addition of ‘Wide Type’ edge panels which will also come to the S6 Edge and S6 Edge Plus with their impending upgrade to Android Marshmallow. As the name suggests, Wide Type panels allow for richer functionality including a compass, phone status and news widgets rather akin to the ‘Live Tiles’ Microsoft MSFT -1.89% uses on Windows Phone/Windows 10 Mobile.

 

As with ‘Narrow Type’ edge panels, Wide Type panels are accessed with a swipe from the edge of the phone. The exact position for the swipe and which panel(s) you prefer to see can be customised in settings, along with the ability to add multiple panels that can be cycled through with additional swipes. It remains something of a gimmick, but is improving month on month.

Looking at the big picture, we now know just about everything about what Samsung plans to release on February 21st. This including detailed specifications for both the Galaxy S7 and Galaxy S7 Edge and their slightly modified designs.

 

Galaxy S6 Review

Samsung Galaxy S6 review
Samsung answers its critics with the new flagship Galaxy S6. The playing field has truly been levelled...

Galaxy S6Samsung has a job to do here. While by no means a sales flop, there’s a feeling that the company lost its way somewhat with the Galaxy S5. That it just wasn’t a flagship worthy of the company bearing the standard for Android in the war against Apple.

The S6, then, is an opportunity to bounce back - and Samsung hasn’t squandered it.

Just about every criticism levelled at the S5 has been fixed, and while it might not cause your friends to go quite as enviously green as the Galaxy S6 Edge, the vanilla S6 has 99.9% of the substance, just skimming off that top layer of flashy panache.

The people who said Samsung had lost its mojo were wrong.

Heart of Glass

For years we’ve been complaining about Samsung’s plastic phones. The Galaxy S5 and its predecessors, all the way back to the Galaxy S in 2010, were plastic. In the old days it was fine, but we got tired of paying £500 for phones that felt, well, cheap.

All that has changed. There is practically no plastic on the Samsung Galaxy S6. Its front and back are super-tough Gorilla Glass 4, its sides aluminium.

 


 

Galaxy S6 Galaxy S6
Galaxy S6  Our Geekbench 3 scores suggest the Galaxy S6 is a massive 20% more powerful than rival flagships such as the HTC One M9. It scores upwards of 5200 points, where you’ll top out at about 4400 points from a Snapdragon 810 CPU - at least from our testing so far. This is incredible power, outdoing some laptops.

We’re also pretty impressed with how hot it gets. Or to be more precise, how hot it doesn’t get. Sure, it gets a bit warm when put under pressure for a while, but nothing like what some people experience with the Sony Xperia Z3, another metal and glass phone. It seems to get warmest when charging, which Samsung has turbo-charged for 2015.

How does it keep its cool? I have to get a little bit geeky to explain it. The Galaxy S6’s Exynos 7420 CPU has transistors that are 14nm across, while the rival Snapdragon uses a 20nm process. Smaller transistors are the grey matter cells of a CPU, and smaller ones mean greater efficiency, and less energy wasted as heat.

We’re not quite sure how Samsung has soldiered so far ahead, but it really seems to have done so - and it could prove a huge advantage through this phone generation.

The Sony Xperia Z3 has a similar glass ’n’ metal style, but the Galaxy S6’s curves are softer and the handset itself less wide. There’s a hint of boxiness to it, but at just 6.8mm thick it’s not going to be too much of a handful for most adults out there.

It feels great. And switching between it and the Note 4 just proves that Samsung should really have given up on its dream of leather effect plastic phones a lot earlier.

The Samsung Galaxy S6 feels more high-end, more expensive than any phone Samsung made last year. It’s a unibody mobile too, meaning you can’t rip off the back panel to get hold of the battery.

We’re fine with that, but Samsung has also removed the memory card slot. It has presumably noticed that Apple makes more than a few quid upselling people to 128GB iPhones and want a piece of the action. Why would you otherwise when a 64GB microSD card cost about £20 these days?

Some people are sure to be annoyed, but then plenty will be happy with the entry-level 32GB Galaxy S6 anyway. On contract, the upgrade to the 64GB model will cost you an extra £5 a month, and there’s even a 128GB model out there for those happy to spend a small fortune on a phone. It’s set to cost around £800.

It’s disappointing when this is so clearly a money-making exercise. But other than that, the Samsung Galaxy S6 hardware is excellent. As usual, it’s jam-packed with features including an IR transmitter, NFC, apt-X support and Wi-Fi ac. There’s even a barometer inside.

Not everyone cares about these extras, but the basics are good too. The power button sits right under your thumb, and, finally, Samsung has aced its fingerprint scanner hardware.

As with the Samsung Galaxy S5, it sits under the main Home button. But now, instead of having to swipe a finger across it, you just place a finger on it, just like the iPhone 6 Touch ID sensor. It works just as well, too, if perhaps a fraction of a second slower.

It’s miles better than the scanner on the Galaxy Note 4 and Galaxy S5, either way. If it doesn’t work, it’s invariably your fault.

There’s also a big shift in screen tech. As with the LG G3, the Samsung Galaxy S6 makes the leap up to QHD screen resolution. Stretched across 5.1 inches that gets you pixel density of 577ppi. Pretty amazing, right?

Unless your eyes are far, far better than ours, it’s physically impossible to discern the pixels. Think you can? You’re probably an eagle.

Funnily enough, though, the screen isn’t actually one of the Samsung Galaxy S6’s most obvious improvements. But only because the Samsung Galaxy S5 already has a corker of a display.

Both use Super AMOLED screens getting you flawless contrast and deep blacks regardless of whether you’re outside or frantically sending a text in the cinema before the trailers start. It’s the sort of screen that makes you wonder: where do we go from here? Well, there are still reflections and we bet there are a few more curved screens like the S6 Edge’s and LG G Flex 2’s somewhere on the horizon. But this is quite the achievement already.

You can also choose whether to have your colours super-vivid or more accurate and natural. This is nothing new, being a Samsung staple, but is still a great feature anyway.

The sheer processor power can’t hurt, either. As of March 2015, the Samsung Galaxy S6 has the most powerful phone processor we’ve tried. Samsung has broken away from the pack this year, using its own Exynos 7420 CPU rather than a Qualcomm Snapdragon chip like the HTC One M9’s.

We had heard that the top dog Snapdragon 810 CPU’s being prone to overheating was the reason, but the Exynos also seems to be a good deal more powerful. This isn’t the sort of thing you’re going to notice every day, but Samsung has really done amazing work here.

 

 

Note 10.1 (2014)

March 1, 2014 posted by Jesse Oguntimehin

Phone Review of SAMSUNG GALAXY Note 10.1 (2014) Edition

Samsung is ever present  in Nigeria, releasing their new products in Nigeria as soon as they are available in other markets . Gone are the days we had to wait weeks on end before a new Samsung product became available in Nigeria.

One of Samsung’s latest devices – the Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 2014 Edition (WiFi + 3G) has been with me for more than a week now. I got it as a loaned unit from Samsung Mobile Nigeria for two weeks and I have been using it as my primary tablet.

In this article, whenever I say Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, I’m referring to the 2014 edition.  I’ll refer to the first edition of the Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 as the Original Samsung GALAXY Note.
Design

The Note 10.1 is the same size with the iPad Air though the screen estate is different. The screen estate of the Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1 is closer to the edges of the phone than the iPad. Unlike the original Samsung GALAXY Note 10.1, the 2014 latest edition has hardware home, function and back buttons. The way the logo is displayed on the Note 10.1 shows that Samsung designs it in a way that suggests that they want you to use the tablet in the landscape mode.

It comes with a pen/stylus popularly called the S Pen. Samsung has tweaked the Android OS to enable the Note 10.1 perform some magic. The more you explore the apps that have been preloaded that makes use of the S Pen and those developed by third-party app developers, the more you’ll enjoy using the S Pen. The S Pen equips you with the ability to dazzle your friends and also get creative–if you’re the artistic type.

The Back of the Note 10.1 is made with a material that feels like plastic coated with leather. There’s a 8 MP front view camera and a 2 MP rear view camera.

Read more...